Madoline Glen

Madoline Glen (also called Birdwood Gully Round Walk) is one of my favourite bush walks. It is 2.6 km and takes about 45 minutes if you don’t stop along the way but there is plenty to explore so it usually takes us longer. It is a great walk for children because it has such variety. There are shallow creeks, bridges, stepping stones, caves, fallen trees, boardwalks rock overhangs, waterfalls, ferns, angophoras and a lovely grotto. It does get a bit soggy after a lot of rain but otherwise, it is an easy walk.

We usually start at the barely visible entrance to the walk on Bednal Road that leads down into the ferny gully. Before long we are surrounded by bird song, the gurgle of the water and towering trees. We often take a picnic because there are so many places to stop and relax.

I have many memories of my children complaining loudly at first about having to go for a walk but then having a wonderful time exploring the caves, spotting yabbies in the creeks and imagining along the way that they are having adventures in various fantasy worlds from books they had read. They don’t always enjoy the climb out that ends up on Lucinda Road but they always survive! Of course the walk can be done in reverse as well, starting on Lucinda Road, but either way there will be a bit of a climb out.

I like this walk because it is easy to fit into a morning or an afternoon and it is reasonably accessible. You can easily walk to it from Springwood Station or if you are driving, it is a simple turn off the Great Western Highway at Moorecourt Avenue, Springwood (and then left onto Bednal Road). If the walk has worked up an appetite there are plenty of cafés to check out afterwards in nearby Springwood.

As with any bush walk it is important to take drinking water, wear sturdy, covered shoes and take some first aid supplies. It is also a good idea to let someone know where you’ll be.

I hope you get to try this walk one day!

A Stitch in Time

One of the most captivating opening scenes in a film can been seen in Bright Star directed by Jane Campion. In the scene, Fanny Brawne (played by Abbie Cornish) is stitching by a window as her little sister ‘Toots’, watches on. The scene is shot close up so each meticulous stitch through the fabric is shown in exquisite detail. Watch here:

Fanny Brawne is a talented and confident young woman who designs and sews her own clothes. Her fine work is featured throughout the film in her splendid costumes. The fabric textures, colours and needlework are sumptuous. And Fanny gets some cracker lines. She boasts to John Keats (the famous poet and her love interest) and his friend Charles Brown,

‘My stitching has more merit and admirers that your two scribblings put together. And I can make money from it.’

And later, alone to John Keats:

‘This is the first frock in all of Woolwich and Hampstead to have a triple pleated mushroom collar.’

Oh to be like Fanny Brawne with a needle and thread!

The other day I went to put on my favourite red cardigan and noticed the seam coming apart along the collar. My first thought was to return it to the store but when I found my receipt, it was two months old. Hmmm… The ‘simple living’ voice inside reminded me that mending is better anyway.

Dilemma. Even though I have daydreams of making my own fabulous fashion like Fanny Brawne, the reality is that my sewing skills are ordinary. They are best described as entry level. I can thread a needle, sew on a button, do blanket stitch, running stitch, back stitch and machine sew straight lines.

Not brilliant, but my sewing know-how is enough for basic mending so I toughened up and I got out my little wooden sewing box. I sat down next to the window just like Fanny Brawne. In minutes the mending was done and I will get to wear my beloved cardigan many more times. I decided to mend the cuff of my trench coat while I was at it. In the end it was very satisfying and good for the soul.

I could certainly work on my skills though! I found a variety of resources on the internet that teach basic mending skills. Too many to mention and I prefer books anyway so I found a couple of books on mending in our local bookshop, The Turning Page. http://www.indies.com.au/TheTurningPageBookshop

The first one was Mending Matters by Katrina Rodabaugh, published in 2018 by Abrams. For starters, I love the title and the book is beautifully presented. Apart from clear instructions for various mending techniques, the author writes convincingly about the benefits of mending and slow fashion.

The other book I found was Make and Mend by Jessica Marquez, published in 2018 by Watson-Guptill Publications. Make and Mend is a gorgeous guide to the Japanese art of sashiko or ‘visible mending’ in which mending becomes a featured work of art. If you enjoy sewing and want to expand your skills, this could be your next thing!

I know from experience that mending can sometimes be a daunting prospect. So if you are a bit wobbly like me, best advice is to start small with achievable projects and if you can, find a friend to help you learn.

For big mending jobs, alterations or whatever is beyond you, there are people who can help. I have used the excellent services of A Stitch Above in Springwood. To find A Stitch Above: Suite 5a, 167-169 Macquarie Road, Springwood. It’s upstairs. You will also find there the most beautifully handcrafted children’s clothing line called Archie Bee. Such sweeeeeeet little outfits! Go check them out on instagram: https://www.instagram.com/archiebee.clothing/?hl=en

or here: https://archiebee.com.au/

In the meantime, happy mending!